1975 Pontiac Trans AM – the very first real muscle car in the world

1975 Pontiac Trans AM – the very first real muscle car in the world

EngineV 8Horsepower185 HP (136.16 KW) @ 3600 RPMTorque427 Nm / 315 ft-lb / 2000Weight1676 Kg / 3695 lbs Drive TypeRWDEngine LocationLongitudinally frontTransmission4-speed manual

Starting with building a sports car, Pontiac eventually developed the Trans AM, one of the most successful American muscle cars, which became a real legend. It was practically the very first real muscle car in the world.

Source: American Muscle Car Museum

In 1969, the iconic modification of the Pontiac Trans AM, named after the Trans American racing series, entered the market for the first time (interestingly the model never participated there). Externally, the Pontiac Firebird Trans AM of 1969 differed from the regular version of the model in bright white body color and two longitudinal blue stripes along the upper plane. A spoiler appeared on the trunk lid. The machine was equipped with the most productive “engine” – a 6.6-liter V8 with “Ram Air III” and “Ram Air IV” packages, as well as a modified suspension that allowed it to corner at higher speeds and more precise steering.

Historical reference

Source: Exotic Cars of Houston

The first Pontiac Firebird, which rolled off the production line in late 1967, was actually not quite the machine that plant general manager John DeLorean imagined. He wanted a sports vehicle equipped with two specially designed seats. However, instead, at the insistence of GМ top management, the company had to build the muscle car on the same basis as the Chevrolet Camaro. However, Pontiac’s new model was quite different from the Camaro. Launched as a new American road machine, Firebird quickly became highly popular. On the verge of the popularity of pony cars a new racing series called Trans Am was created, capable of competing even with real sports vehicle competitions. During this time, Jim Wangers was in charge of advertising for General Motors. He once recalled: “The racing version was practically the first entry of American machines into big-time motorsport.” For more than 30 years of production, more than 2 million copies were sold. At the same time, Pontiac engineers constantly continued to improve the model until it became a world-class muscle car. And their greatest achievement was their huge popularity: it was a great opportunity for those boys and girls who were too young to own and drive a real racing machine but still wanted a real American muscle car.

Difficult 70s

Source: Vintage Car Collector

The beginning of the 70s was a tough time for mighty muscle fans. The insurance lobby pushed for large price increases for high-performance vehicles, and consumer enthusiasm began to wane. Well, the fuel crisis that followed, drove the final nail into the coffin of muscle and pony machines. But at Pontiac, until the last, they believed in the wonderful future of their sports offspring. By 1974, the high-performance V-8 engine had all but disappeared from the American market. So Chevrolet stopped making the Z/28, while the Trans Am continued to improve. This model enjoyed extraordinary popularity. Fans of the model loved it primarily for its powerful engine, bold style, and excellent handling.

1975 release

Despite all the difficulties of the time, the Firebird even managed to increase sales – as many as 84,063 vehicles (and Trans AM increased sales 3 times compared to 1974) for the entire 1975! Catalytic converters had become mandatory this year, and fuel economy had brought new standards. The 1975 edition featured a more aggressive look. Flashes, spoilers, an air intake on the hood, extractors, and distinctive Firebird decals appeared on the machine. The 1975 model year exterior featured more rounded rear windows, changed rooflines, and turn signals were inserted into the grille. Also,  the model abandoned the Super Duty engine, and the TurboHydramatic 400 automatic. For this, a smaller TurboHydramatic 350 automatic was found to be sufficient. Extras on the release included air conditioning, tilt steering, power brakes, and power steering. In total, 27,274 Trans Ams were produced in 1975.

Did You know?

Source: Vintage Car Collector

The Pontiac Trans AM has become a real treasure not only for collectors but also for film lovers. The 1975 release appeared in such films and TV series as The Junkman, 1982, The Usual Suspects, 1995, Superman, 1978, The Rockford Files, 1974-1980, The Fall Guy, 1981-1986, Silk Stalkings, 1991-1999, Samurai Cop, 1991 and more.

Check out our inventory for this model or other classic gems.

1975 Pontiac Trans AM – the very first real muscle car in the world

EngineV 8Horsepower185 HP (136.16 KW) @ 3600 RPMTorque427 Nm / 315 ft-lb / 2000Weight1676 Kg / 3695 lbs Drive TypeRWDEngine LocationLongitudinally frontTransmission4-speed manual

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